Drinking 25 Cups of Coffee a Day Won’t Harm Your Heart, According To Study

Here’s some good news for coffee drinkers: according to a new study, coffee isn’t bad for your heart! In fact, those who are addicted to the caffeinated beverage can indulge in as many as 25 cups of joe per day.

While previous studies suggested that the drink could be linked to cardiovascular issues—such as the stiffening of arteries—the new study shows that lovers of the beverage have no reason whatsoever to trim their consumption.

In a study of over 8,000 people across the U.K., it was found that those who imbibed an average of five cups per day fared no worse in terms of arterial health than those who drank under a cup per day.

The study, funded in part by the British Heart Foundation, is being presented at the British Cardiovascular Society Conference in Manchester, U.K., reports the Daily Mail.

Researchers from Queen Mary University of London divided 8,412 participants into three separate groups for the study.

The first group was comprised of those who drink under a cup of coffee per day, while the second included those who drink between one and three cups on a daily basis. The third group contained those who drink over three cups per day—including a few who drank a shocking 25 cups of java on the daily.

Participants were then subject to heart scans and infrared pulse wave tests, with researchers taking into account the age and weight of participants, as well as whether or not they smoke. Either way, the results held true.

The experts discovered that those who drank even much higher amounts of coffee had no more of a likelihood of stiffened arteries than those whose consumption of the drink was minimal.

The study contradicts previous research pinning the blame on coffee for the stiffening of arteries, heart pressure, and increased likelihood of stroke or heart attack.

Doctor Kenneth Fung of the Queen Mary University of London said:

“Despite the huge popularity of coffee worldwide, different reports could put people off enjoying it.

While we can’t prove a causal link in this study, our research indicates coffee isn’t as bad for the arteries as previous studies would suggest.”

Professor Metin Avkiran, associate medical director at the British Heart Foundation, noted that the study simply “rules out one of the potential detrimental effects of coffee on our arteries.”

It turns out, a regular coffee habit has been associated with a lower risk of both Type 2 diabetes and Parkinson’s disease, with one study even linking it to a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease, according to the American Heart Association (AHA). Habitual coffee drinking has also been linked to a lowered risk of coronary heart disease in women.

Regardless, the AHA has warned that adding sugar and cream to java—as well as opting for fancier frappuccinos and other blended calorie-and-sugar-packed varieties of coffee—can be quite bad for heart health.

According to U.S. federal dietary guideline, three to five cups of coffee can be part of a well-balanced and healthy diet—but only when it comes to pure black coffee.

But as the new study from the U.K. shows, there may be some hope yet for those who guzzle 25 cups per day, even if the heart health community in the U.S. warns against consuming caffeine in excess.

By Elias Marat | Creative Commons | TheMindUnleashed.com